Scroll down to find the the 2-day schedule and links to presentations. Please contact us at webmaster@rco.wa.gov for any presentations you don’t see linked here – some files are too large for the web.

April 8

Click here to view a recording of the opening and welcome.

Opening and Welcome

Welcome from conference co-hosts

Salmon Recovery: Twenty Years in the Making: Governor Gary Locke

Honoring Tribal Treaty Rights Through Bold Salmon Recovery 
Panelists: Amy Trainer, Cecilia Gobin, Dave Herrera, David Troutt, Paul Williams

Plenary and Keynote Speaker

Click here to view a recording of the plenary and keynote speaker.

Washington State’s Approach to Save the Southern Resident Killer Whale Task Force co-chairs

dxʷal kʷi gʷəslax̌adčəɫ: Remembering Where We Come From: Cecilia Gobin, Conservation Policy Analyst, Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission

Breakout Session 1

Invasive Species Impacts to Species Recovery, the Environment, and Economy: Washington State’s Comprehensive Approach to Prevention, Containment, and Management

Flowering Rush: Impacts to Salmon Recovery, the Environment and Economy
Jenifer Parsons, Washington Department of Ecology and Jennifer Andreas, Washington State University 

Effective Methods to Revegetate Reed Canarygrass Dominated Wetlands and Riparian Areas without the use of Herbicides
Peter Bahls, Northwest Watershed Institute

Northern Pike are Coming and You Should be Afraid
Joe Maroney, Kalispel Tribe of Indians

Watershed Recovery, Reed Canarygrass and Scotch Broom — Rationale and Strategies for Investment and Action
Jill Silver, 10,000 Years Institute

Bull Trout: The Forgotten Fish

Alex Conley, Yakima Basin Fish and Wildlife Recovery Board
Judy Neibauer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Joe Maroney, Kalispel Tribe of Indians

Time Capsules and Tarot Cards — The Increasing Complexity Of Restoration Projects Over The Last Twenty Years And What The Future Holds For Restoration

Click here to view a recording of this session.

Countyline Levee Setback Project: A Flood Protection Project along the Lower White River, Washington Yields Multiple Benefits
Stephanie Shelton, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks

Climate Change and Sea Level Rise – Tips and Tools for Evaluating Future Conditions with Hydraulic Models
David Cline, Shannon & Wilson

Nez Perce Tribe Watershed Restoration – 1997-2019
Heidi McRoberts, Nez Perce Tribe

What it Takes to Move the Needle: Sweat, Diesel, and Jet Fuel
Eli Asher, Cowlitz Indian Tribe

Restoring Water Quality Through Rebuilding Hyporheic Function
Mike (Rocky) Hrachovec, Natural Systems Design

Breaking Down Barriers: How Science, Policy, and Community Resolve has Shaped Salmon Recovery in the Puyallup River Watershed
Kristin Williamson, South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group 

20 Years of Restoration in the NF Stilly: Changing Strategies and Lessons Learned are Shaping the Future of Salmon Recovery
Tracy Drury, Anchor QEA and Andy Brew, Anchor QEA 

It’s More Complicated Than We Thought…
Mike Rustay, Snohomish County and Gretchen Glaub, Snohomish County 

Intersections in Salmon And Southern Resident Killer Whale Recovery

View presentationSession chairs: Whitney Neugebauer, Whale Scout/Orca Salmon Alliance; Colleen Weiler, Whale And Dolphin Conservation; Cindy Hansen, Orca Network Session Session panelists: Lynne Barre, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration; Deborah Giles, Wild Orca and University of Washington Friday Harbor Labs; Misty Macduffee, Raincoast Conservation Foundation; Regan Mcnatt, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Northwest Fisheries Science Center; David Troutt, Nisqually Indian Tribe

Chehalis Basin Aquatic Species Restoration Plan – Insights on Basin Wide Integrated Restoration Planning and Implementation

Why the Chehalis, and Why Now?
Emelie McKain, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife 

Science and Restoration Planning
Mara Zimmerman, Coast Salmon Partnership 

Large Scale Integration of Landowners and Stakeholders
Kirsten J Harma, Chehalis Basin Lead Entity 

Informing the Plan through Implementation — Taking Early Reach Scale Action and Securing Landowner Willingness
Tom Kollasch, Grays Harbor Conservation District 

Breakout Session 2

Hatcheries and Hydro: What We’re Learning and Where We’re Headed

Hatcheries and Recovery: Understanding the Risks and Benefits
Andrew Murdoch, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Trends in Abundance, Survival and Size, and the Optimization of Hatchery Releases to Maximize Adult Returns of Chinook Salmon
James Losee, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Estimating Hatchery Fish on the Spawning Grounds: Key Factors that Influence Carcass Recovery Probability
Patrick Hughes, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Monitoring Puget Sound Early Winter Steelhead Hatchery Releases Probability
Bethany E Craig, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Reintroduction of Salmon into the Upper Columbia River
John Sirois, Upper Columbia United Tribes

Using PIT Tag Data to Estimate Life Cycle Survival of Natural Origin Upper Columbia Spring Chinook
Dan Rawding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Flexible Spill Agreement: Adapting Federal Dam Operations to New Science and Energy Market Conditions
Michael Garrity, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Ecosystem Response to the Removal of Dams on the Elwha River: A Brief Overview
Mike McHenry, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe 

Integrating Climate Change Adaptation Measures into Restoration Design and Reserve Planning in the lower Columbia River

Click here for a video recording of this session. Session starts at about 2:16:30.

Integrating Climate-Smart Conservation into our Ecosystem Restoration Program for the Lower Columbia River
Catherine Corbett, Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership

Assessing the Resiliency of Lower Columbia River Wetlands to Climate Induced Sea Level Rise
Keith Marcoe, Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership

Enhancing Cold Water Refuges at Small Tributaries in the Lower Columbia River
Chris Collins, Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership

Restoration Using Multiple Climate Adaptation Measures for a 1,000-acre Floodplain Section of the Lower Columbia River
Curtis Loeb, Wolf Water Resources

Incorporating Future Climate Predictions into Today’s Ecosystem Restoration Design
Caitlin Alcott, Inter-Fluve and Matt Cox, Inter-Fluve

Integrating Climate Change Projections into Culvert Design and Research
Jane B Atha, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Columbia-Pacific Passage Habitat Restoration
Jason R Smith, Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce

Designing Habitat for a Changing Climate: A Quantitative Approach
Joseph M Parzych, Inter-Fluve

Juvenile salmon and estuary ecosystem function across deltas and restoration projects in Puget Sound: What have we learned, where are we going?

Successful Juvenile Life History Strategies in Returning Adult Chinook from Five Puget Sound Populations
Lance Campbell, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Landscape Features and Density Dependence in Tidal Delta Habitats: Juvenile Chinook in Four Puget Sound Estuaries
Correigh Greene, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Eric Beamer, Skagit River System Cooperative

Tidal Channel Erosion Rates Depend on Marsh Restoration Site Size
Greg Hood, Skagit River System Cooperative

Juvenile Chinook Habitat Restoration on the Delta of the Fraser River Estuary
Misty MacDuffee, Raincoast Conservation Foundation

A Decade of Post–Restoration Monitoring in the Nisqually River Delta: Structure, Function, and Benefits for Juvenile Salmon
Melanie Davis, U.S. Geological Survey

Habitat Structure and Function Following Estuary Restoration in the Skokomish
Lisa Belleveau, Skokomish Indian Tribe

The Union River Estuary Restoration: Five Years Later
Mendy A Harlow, Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group and Clayton David, Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group

15 Years of Estuary Restoration in the Dosewallips Delta
Micah M Wait, Wild Fish Conservancy

Assessing and Addressing Threats to ESA-listed Salmonids at Ecosystem-Scales

Recovery and Delisting Species Under the Endangered Species Act
Gary Rule, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A Decision Pathway for the Recovery/Delisting of Hood Canal and Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca Summer Chum Salmon
Scott Brewer, Hood Canal Coordinating Council

Coast Salmon Partnership: Integrating People, Plans, and Knowledge into New Salmon Habitat
Mara Zimmerman, Coast Salmon Partnership

Hydropower in Salmon Recovery — the Forgotten “H”
Florian Leischner, Tacoma Power and Phil Sandstrom, Tacoma Power

Tracking Hatchery and Harvest Reform to Support Recovery in the Lower Columbia Region
Amelia Johnson, Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board and Steve Manlow, Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board

An Assessment of Recovery Partner Implementation of Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Programs: an EF Lewis River Pilot Study
Katie Blauvelt, PC Trask and Associates

Integrating Bull Trout and Salmon Recovery in the Mid—Columbia
Alex Conley, Yakima Basin Fish and Wildlife Recovery Board

Is the Key to Success a 5th “H” (Humans)? Seeking “Win-Win” Opportunities with our All-H Partners
Greer Maier, Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board 

Tuesday, April 9

Breakout Session 3

One Size Does Not Fit All: Planting Riparian Buffers in Working Agricultural Landscapes

Habitat Loss, Restoration, and Treaty Rights — Applying Treaty Rights at Risk in the Context of Variable Width Buffers
Colin M Wahl, Tulalip Tribes

Riparian Buffers: Perspectives from the Land
Melissa Borsting, King County

Using Riparian Science to Establish Recommendations for Variable Width Buffers in the Snoqualmie River Valley
Beth leDoux, King County

The Voluntary Stewardship Program — Protecting Critical Areas and Maintaining Agricultural Viability
Bill Eller, Washington State Conservation Commission

Reecer Creek Floodplain Restoration — Reviewing Restored Channel and Riparian Development
Katrina Strathmann, Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group and Rebecca Wassell, Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group

Changing Rules in Restoration: How New Policies and Permits have Impacted RFEG Riparian Restoration Strategies
Kelsey Taylor, Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group

Riparian Buffer Flexibility Allows for Restoration Success in Woods Creek
Cindy Dittbrenner, Snohomish Conservation District

Integrated Riparian Restoration in the Stillaguamish and Snohomish Watersheds
Kristin Marshall, Snohomish Conservation District

Urban Stormwater Threats and Clean Water Strategies to Conserve and Recover Salmon

Click here to view a recording of this session.

Green Stormwater Infrastructure to Improve Water Quality in Salmon Habitats
Jenifer K McIntyre, Washington State University

Elevated Contaminants in Resident Chinook Salmon Pose a Threat to Salmon Reproduction and to People and Whales that Eat Them
Sandra O’Neill, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Andrea Carey, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry to Identify Organic Contaminants Linked to Urban StormwaterMortality Syndrome
Edward P Kolodziej, Center for Urban Waters

The Urban Mortality Syndrome: Juvenile Coho Salmon as Surrogates for Adult Spawners
Jay W Davis, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Current and Future Vulnerability Mapping for the Coho Urban Mortality Syndrome in Puget Sound
Blake E Feist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Northwest Fisheries Science Center

New Science Informing Endangered Species Management
Doug Osterman, Water Resource Inventory Area 9

Aligning Land Use and Water Quality Across a Gradient of Coho Mortality in Puget Sound
Jessica I Lundin, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Suspect and Non-Target Screening for Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Puget Sound
Zhenyu Tian, University of Washington Tacoma and Center for Urban Waters

Marine Food Web and Habitat Interactions in the Salish Sea

Ecosystem Indicators Development for Steelhead Trout and Coho and Chinook Salmon
Kathryn Sobocinski, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Long Live the Kings

Effect of Multiple Pressures on Early Marine Survival of Juvenile Salmon in Puget Sound
Hem Nalini Morzaria-Luna, Long Live the Kings

Bottom-up Processes Affecting Marine Survival of Salmon in the Salish Sea
Dave Beauchamp, U.S. Geological Survey

Population Specific Consumption of Pacific Herring in Juvenile and Sub-Adult Chinook Salmon in the Salish Sea
Josh Chamberlin, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Eleni Petrou, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Ecological Factors Affecting the Early Marine Survival of Puget Sound Steelhead Smolts
Barry Berejikian, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Characterizing Impacts of the Hood Canal Bridge on Migrating Steelhead Smolts using Acoustic Telemetry
Megan Moore, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Barry Berejikian, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Underwater Video Illustrates that the Hood Canal Bridge Impedes Migration of Salmonids
Hans Daubenberger, Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe and Emily Bishop, Westward Ecology

Restoration Benefits Below the Surface: Developing an Empirical Basis for Connecting Shoreline Restoration to Salmon Recovery
Genoa Sullaway, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Northwest Fisheries Science Center and University of Washington

Communicating Salmon Recovery

Communication Planning 101
Tricia Snyder, Yakima Basin Fish and Wildlife Recovery Board

Big Communications on a Little Budget
Melissa Speeg, Kittitas Conservation Trust

Diverse Stakeholders and Communicating Salmon Recovery
Kelsey Green, American Rivers

From Restoration to Education: Closing the Loop on Salmon Recovery
Claire Williamson, South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group and Jerilyn Walley, South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group

Engaging the Community in Salmon Restoration
Landon Shaffer, Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group and Emily Smith, Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group

Restoration Landscape Narratives: Facing an Uncertain Future Using Active Community Dialog, Technology and Resiliency Planning
Camilla Popp, Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group and Peter Hummel, Anchor QEA

Achieving Zero Watershed Impacts through Salmon-Safe
Ellen K Southard, Salmon Safe

Breakout Session 4

How much space does a river need? Establishing ecological corridors for large scale restoration and monitoring

MAGA: Making Abernathy (Creek) Great Again
Eli Asher, Cowlitz Indian Tribe

Advances in Monitoring of Large-Scale Restoration Efforts
Jennifer O’Neal, Natural Systems Design

Restoring Channel Processes and Habitat on the Alluvial Fan of Illabot Creek
Devin Smith, Skagit River System Cooperative

Establishing a Fluvial Ecological Corridor for the Lower White River in the City of Sumner, WA
Doug Beagle, City of Sumner

Defining Ecological Corridors in Fluvial Networks for Salmon Recovery Assessment, Planning, and Process-Based Restoration
Tim Abbe, Natural Systems Design

Quantitative Tools to Assess Current and Historic Floodplain Connectivity in the Skookumchuck Watershed
Susan Dickerson-Lange, Natural Systems Design

Combining Landowner Outreach and Geomorphic Data to Identify Floodplain-Scale Restoration Potential in Chimacum Creek
Sarah Doyle, North Olympic Salmon Coalition

Fish Passage: Something for Everyone, Tools, Methods, and Funding Options

Click here to view a recording of this session. Sessions starts at 2:19:40.

Removing Powerdale and Middle Fork Nooksack River Dams: Designing Riverbeds for Fish Passage in High Energy Environments
Paul DeVries, R2 Resource Consultants

Winning the Upstream Battle — A Novel Geographic Information System Tool for Prioritizing Fish Passage Barriers from the Upper Columbia
Greer Maier, Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board

Design Considerations for Fish Passage through Floodgates: How to Apply Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Water Crossing Design Guidelines
Tom Slocum, Washington Conservation Districts Northwest Engineering Program

Fish Passage Grant Funding Panel
Justin Zweifel, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Tara Galuska, Recreation and Conservation Office; Melissa Erkel, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Dave Caudill, Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office; Marc Duboiski, Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office; and Miranda Plumb, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Advances in Tidal Habitat Restoration Planning

Failure or Success? Implications of Long-term Tidal Wetland Restoration Monitoring in Lower Columbia River
Sarah Kidd, Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership and Matt Schwartz, Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership

Data is Not Enough: The Importance of Community Engagement in Public Land Restoration on the Lower Columbia River
Alex H Uber, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

An Assessment of Juvenile Hood Canal Summer Chum Use of Nearshore Habitat at Multiple Scales
Micah M Wait, Wild Fish Conservancy and Adrian M Tuohy, Wild Fish Conservancy

Juvenile Salmon Movement Related to the Tide Cycle: A Pilot Study to Inform Tidal Fish Passage in Puget Sound
Doris Small, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Pad Smith, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Influence of Tidal Channel Geometry on Pocket Estuary Restoration Design
Jessica Côté, Blue Coast Engineering

Applying Tidal Landform Scaling to Habitat Restoration Planning, Design, and Monitoring: Leque Island and Zis a Ba Case Studies
Greg Hood, Skagit River Systems Cooperative

Prioritization of Coastal Streams and Embayments Along Puget Sound Shores with a Railroad
Paul Schlenger, Environmental Science Associates

It Takes a Village: Communicating Salmon Recovery and Intersectionality: Panel

Eloise S Harris, Puget Soundkeeper Alliance

Ellen K Southard, Salmon Safe

James Rasmussen, Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition and Technical Advisory Group

Closing Ceremony

Click here to view a recording of the closing ceremony.

Stories from the Puyallup Watershed
Kathleen Berger, Jordan Jobe, Harold Smelt, Kristin Williamson
Local watershed storytelling

Salmon Recovery Network: Making the Washington Way Work

The International Year of the Salmon initiative (2019-2022)–setting the conditions for resilience: Mark Saunders, Director, International Year of the Salmon, North Pacific Region 

Closing remarks from co-hosts

Breakout Session 5

Alluvial Water Storage: Losses from Channel Incision and Potential for Restoration

Stream Restoration as a Strategy to Address Water Scarcity
Michael Kaputa, Chelan County Natural Resource Department

Low-Tech Restoration to Treat Structurally Starved Streams — What is it and Why Do We Need to Do a Lot More of it?
Stephen Bennett, Utah State University

Why Wood Restoration Matters? Changes in Wood Loading on Olympic Peninsula Streams
Mike McHenry, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and Tim Abbe, Natural Systems Design

Going Big With Large Wood: An Example of Landscape Scale Restoration in the Teanaway Community Forest
Ryan DeKnikker, Yakama Nation

Identifying and Quantifying Restorable Water Storage in the Wenatchee
Susan Dickerson-Lange, Natural Systems Design

Channel Incision and the Loss of Water Storage in Drainage Networks
Tim Abbe, Natural Systems Design

Could Beaver Dams Buffer Water Storage Losses from Declining Snowpacks?
Konrad Hafen, University of Idaho

Restoration of Urban Ravines to Increase In-Situ Storage of Sediment and Water
Maggie Stepp, Natural Systems Design

Different monitoring approaches for adaptive management and salmon recovery

Click here for a video recording of this session.

Regional Restoration Evaluation: Lessons from the Salmon Recovery Funding Board’s Project Effectiveness Monitoring Program
Phil Roni, Watershed Sciences Lab, Cramer Fish Sciences

Watershed Scale Effectiveness Monitoring to Support Clean Water Act and Salmon Recovery Objectives
Scott Collyard, Washington Department of Ecology

Fish and In-Stream Habitat Responses to Habitat Restoration Treatments in the Lower Columbia IMW Complex
Jamie Lamperth, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Mill Creek (OR) Study: Assessing the Effects of Large Wood Placement on a Stream Ecosystem
Evan Hayduk, Midcoast Watersheds Council

Watershed Health Monitoring: Standardized Monitoring Methods and Support for Cooperators
Glenn Merritt, Washington Department of Ecology, Environmental Assessment Program

The First Statewide Stream Macroinvertebrate Bioassessment in Washington State with Analysis for Multiple Stressors
Chad Larson, Washington Department of Ecology

The Coast-Wide Collapse in Northeast Pacific Chinook and Steelhead Survival—Missed Opportunities in Salmon Conservation?
David W Welch, Kintama Research Services Ltd and Erin L Rechisky, Kintama Research Services Ltd

Building a Foundation for Measuring Progress – Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board’s Focused Investment Partnerships
Ken Fetcho, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

The Puyallup Watershed: A Case Study in Integrated Floodplain Management

Session Chair: Kathleen Berger, Pierce County Panelists: Jordan Jobe, Washington State University Center For Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources; Isabel Ragland, Pierce Conservation District; Helmut Schmidt, Pierce County; Kristin Williamson, South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group
Phil Roni, Watershed Sciences Lab, Cramer Fish Sciences

Will Work for Salmon, or Careers related to Salmon Recovery

Session Chairs: Sarah Gage, Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office Session; Angelina Quilici, University Of Washington 
Session Panelists: Amee Bahr, Recreation And Conservation Office; Lucas Hall, Long Live The Kings; Kirvie Mesebeluu-Yobech, Kitsap County/West Sound Watershed Council; Rodney Pond, Sound Salmon Solutions; Rudy Salakory, Cowlitz Indian Tribe; Brianna Widner, Washington Invasive Species Council